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Showing posts from March, 2008

Zenit: Opus Dei Opens Its Doors to Everyone

Miriam Díez i Bosch of Zenit.org has an interesting interview with the Vicar General of the personal prelature, Opus Dei, Rev. Monsignor Fernando Ocáriz. Here is a small portion of that interview:

Q: Opus Dei was born to help laypeople in their ordinary life. Are laypeople truly a part of the prelature of Opus Dei, or is the prelature only for the relatively few priests of Opus Dei?

Monsignor Ocáriz: Opus Dei was born precisely to remind everyone, both priests and laypersons, of the universal call to holiness. As [the founder] St. Josemaría taught since 1928, the fact that this call is universal and that God calls each person, means that all upright human realities -- professional work, family and social relations -- can and should be a sanctified and sanctifying reality.

As Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger said when the founder of Opus Dei was canonized, the message of St. Josemaría Escrivá has helped to correct an erroneous idea of sanctity, as thought it were reserved only for the "gr…

Catholic Review Online: Archdiocese to mark bicentennial with special events

George Matysek, Jr. of the Catholic Review Online follows up his story on the Bicentennial of the Archdiocese of Baltimore with a list of the special events to take place.

A special display of historical documents will be unveiled in Laubacher Hall at St. Mary’s Seminary and University, Roland Park, on April 12 at 2 p.m. The exhibit will be open from 4 to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday from April 14 through May 14.

[...]

A series of 7 p.m. lectures named in honor of America’s founding archbishop, John Carroll, will be launched April 22 at the Baltimore Basilica. Archbishop Timothy Dolan of Milwaukee will deliver the first lecture April 22, speaking about John Carroll. George Weigel, a Baltimore native and biographer of Pope John Paul II, who serves as a distinguished senior fellow with the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, D.C., will speak May 12. His topic will be “Popes, power and world politics: from Leo XIII to Benedict XVI.”

Colleen Carroll Campbell, author of “The New Faithfu…

Ignatius Insight Scoop: The Church Betrayed? The bishops need to investigate CRS

Update: An update to this story was posted by Carl Olson on his blog on April 1st. The posted email and ensuing discussion can be found here.

The April 2008 edition of Catholic World News carries an important story by Professor Germain Grisez on CRS. Here is just a small snippet from the Carl Olson blog:

The Church never acts on her own in carrying on Jesus’ mission. Jesus is always with her when she preaches and teaches, administers the sacraments, and does charitable works. Thus, she fulfills his command to spread the Gospel and makes him really present, manifesting his love to each of his brothers and sisters in every nation until the end of time. When Catholic charitable agencies properly feed the hungry or provide health care, those who receive help meet Jesus, learn how much he offers, and are given a new opportunity—perhaps a unique one—to respond to his love and share in his kingdom.In 1943, the bishops of the United States established Catholic Relief Services (CRS) to help…

Monasteries and Abbeys Online

I am often "searched" for the location of a particular Abbey or Monastery online (and usually within the United States). I have just located two delightful websites! Both links have been added to the Favorites Sites in the right menu!

This site is the official Order of Saint Benedict website which has a "search form" for locating Abbeys, Monasteries and Schools.This site is courtesy of Dr. Deborah Vess of Georgia College and State University. It has Monasteries located worldwide categorized by Religious Order and location. It is also marvelous!

Chiesa.com: Two stories from Sandro Magister on Magdi Cristiano Allam

WWW.Chiesa Online published two stories relating to the Baptism of Magdi Cristiano Allam by Sandro Magister. The first is here and the second, published today, is here.

Early Roundup - Feast of the Annunciation, March 31st, 2008

Patrick Archbold of Creative Minority Report feels that "It's Morning Again in the Catholic Church." I have to concur on this delightful take! Don't miss the YouTube clip!RORATE CAELI: Ave, Sancta Dei Genitrix! Classic Rorate Caeli! The Latin Collect for the Feast of the Annunciation.Traditional Latin Mass Propers in English: THE ANNUNCIATION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Catholic Review Online: two stories of interest

The Catholic Review is the Archdiocesan newspaper of the Archdiocese of Baltimore. The online edition carries two stories of interest:

Cindy Wooden reports that the liberalization of the Tridentine Mass is bearing fruit. The story deals with the interview of Cardinal Castrillon-Hoyos to L'Osservatore Romano widely reported on traditional blogs.George P. Matysek, Jr. reports on a tour by Archbishop O'Brien through the Carroll County area. His Excellency praised the Eucharistic Adoration that is prominent at some parishes such as Saint John's in Westminster and called for an increase in religious vocations.

Evening Roundup-Divine Mercy Sunday or "Low Sunday"

Frequently Asked Questions on this Blog (FAQs)

Updated: December 15th, 2011
TLM (Extraordinary Form) Masses in Maryland and Surrounding States, F.S.S.P Locations, N.O. Masses, N.O. Latin Masses, Shrines, Monasteries, Abbeys, Training in the TLM, Latin PropersSacred Music, Chant, Chant Libraries (MP3s and text), Hymnals for ParishesVestments and Other Items Needed for the TLM MassReligious Orders: Benedictines, Carmelites, Dominicans, Search Forms


The Traditional Latin Mass (Tridentine; Extraordinary Form; Usus Antiquior; Missal of 1962) or Finding Regional Novus Ordo Sunday Masses

This blog is called "Traditional Latin Mass in Maryland." What are you trying to accomplish?[Answer: I am trying to assist people searching for the Traditional Latin Mass in the greater Maryland area to find a Sunday Mass which celebrates the Usus Antiquior or Extraordinary Form].Which States are covered? [Presently, I cover Maryland, the D.C. suburbs, Washington, D.C. itself, Northern Virginia, some of West Virginia and Southern Pennsylvania]…

WDTPRS: IMPORTANT: tracking statistics for the Extraordinary Use is neccesary

New: Saint James the Greater Parish, Charles Town, WVA

I received this update from a colleague about the TLM at Saint James the Greater Parish in Charles Town, WVA:

Sarge,

We had a beautiful Easter High Mass at St. James. The Schola, although newly formed, did a marvelous job, thanks to our Liturgy and Music Director (who had worked in Rome before coming to our Parish).

The next two TLM Masses at St. James will be on:

Saturday, April 12 at 9:00 am
Sunday, April 13 at 4:00 pm

Also, EWTN is announcing to televise a TLM Mass on the 3rd Sunday of Easter. From EWTN's web site:

THIRD SUNDAY OF EASTER
MASS IN EXTRAORDINARY FORM LIVE
2 hrs

Solemn High Mass of the Third Sunday of Easter in the Extraordinary Form. The Traditional Latin Mass from the Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament.
4/6/2008 8:00 AM ET & 5:00 AM PT


Feedback is the life blood of any blog. Please contact me if you have information on new Masses, photos of your liturgy or any news of interest to the TLM community in our region.


WDTPRS: Mass of Ages: Ignacio Barreiro on implementing Summorum Pontificum

Father Zuhlsdorf has a long post on an article taken from the magazine,"Mass of the Ages," written by Msgr. Ignacio Barreiro. The long "point by point" discussion is well worth reading. In short, what is allowed and what is proscribed now that the TLM is again freely available?
[...] The strongest of them, and the one I have to ponder a while, is the argument that whoever wishes the principal also desires what is accessory. It seems to me that we can’t just leap to the assumption that all those old decrees and so forth from the Sacred Congregation of Rites are all revived with Summorum Pontificum or that canons in the old Code are still in force, for example obliging women to wear chapel veils, etc.True, true...

Adoremus: Jubilate Deo Latin Chants

I am saddened that more Catholics are unaware of or do not actively support Adoremus. This site strives for beauty in our Masses and liturgy and is readily available on the web. The organization publishes a monthly newsletter and asks only for donations for support. Sadly, the questions/answers on the back page concerning routine "irregularities at Mass" or violations of the GIRMs is one of its most popular features.

I have noted "seekers" who wish to find basic Latin hymns or even a "smattering of Chant" and want to know where to find it? Well, here is a link to a vital page that is a beginning. This is to what the Second Vatican Council considered to be the barest minimum of traditional Chants and Hymns taken from the Graduale Romanum. It came to be known as the Jubilate Deo and is published here by Adoremus. Note it is linked to an MP3 format.

Here is a link to their full Table of Contents on music articles. Please join!

In the Light of the Law: Proposal: Impose excommunication for euthanasia

Dr. Edward N. Peters of In the Light of the Law puts forth the proposal that those who commit euthanasia should be excommunicated.

For some months I have been researching and writing an article on euthanasia in canon law. I hoped against hope that it might remain an academic exercise, but (to judge from, say, this report on the practice of euthanasia in Belgium) the speed with which the Western, specifically Christian, protection of innocent life is collapsing suggests that one of my projected canonical recommendations deserves an earlier hearing than appearance in a peer-reviewed journal can afford.

Simply put, I recommend that euthanasia be made an excommunicable offense under the 1983 Code of Canon Law.I hope his proposal is given serious consideration in light of his arguments.

Update: Saint John the Baptist Parish, Front Royal, VA

I received an email with some news on a local TLM Parish, Saint John the Baptist in Front Royal, VA:

There is a very well established community in Front Royal, VA for the Traditional Mass at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church. We attend this Mass every once in a while. In addition to their Sunday Tridentine Mass at 12:30, their new Pastor, Fr. Fassano, has recently added two weekly masses:On Fridays at 7:00 pm, and on Saturdays at 8:30 am (except on 1st Saturdays). This is not in their website yet, but I called the Parish office and they confirmed this information.

Thanks for the news tip!

WDTPRS: More Curia Rumors

Early Roundup - Easter Saturday, March 29th, 2008

Latin Propers for "Low Sunday" or Missa Quasi Modo

I am indebted to the Tridentine Latin Rite Missal Project for the Latin translations. Note that only a Missal such as the Baronius (F.S.S.P. edition, Summorum Pontificum) will have all the Latin text.
This Sunday is called from the first words of the Introit, the Sunday of Quasimodo, or Sunday in Albis (deponendis), because the neophytes on that day put aside their white garments. In English the term Low Sunday is in contrast with Easter or High Sunday. Another Latin name Pascha clausum is preserved in the French: Paques closes and in the Dutch or Flemish: Beloken Pasen: close of Easter, this Sunday ending the Octave. -- Let us proclaim our faith in the risen Lord, and in His divine Presence in the Holy Eucharist. INTROIT ¤ I. Peter 2. 2Quasi modo geniti infantes, alleluia: rationabiles, sine dolo lac concupiscite, alleluia, alleluia, alleluia. -- Exsultate Deo adjutori nostro: jubilate Deo Jacob. V.: Gloria Patri . . . Quasi modo . . .As newborn babes, alleluia, desire the rational m…

Changes coming in two key Curial posts?

AmericanPapist:: Pope trip: Friday Mar 28 Roundup

Thomas Peters of AmericanPapist does a really nice job of gathering five stories germane to the Holy Father's visit in April. One is the story posted below from The New Liturgical Movement. Highly recommended!


Traditional Vocations Blog: Vocations and the Traditional Latin Liturgy

A new blog called Traditional Vocations Blog is now linked to the Blogroll on the right menu. The blog concentrates on vocations to both men's and women's traditional Religious Orders. One recent post featured a link to Monasteries, for example.

Have a look!

NLM: Brace yourself for the Pope's Mass in D.C.

Archdioce of Baltimore Website: Archdiocese Announces Bicentennial Events

This article was posted today on the Archdiocesan website:

Pope Benedict XVI Will Recognize Baltimore’s Anniversary During Historic Visit April 15-20

03/28/2008

Archbishop Edwin F. O’Brien, Archbishop of Baltimore, unveiled the official logo and program commemorating the Premier See of Baltimore’s 200th anniversary as an Archdiocese at a press conference at the Baltimore Basilica earlier today.The program of events kicks off the weekend preceding Pope Benedict XVI’s arrival to the United States with a ground-breaking ceremony on Friday, April 11 at 11 a.m. at the future site of the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden, located at Charles and Franklin Streets. On Saturday, April 12 at 2 p.m. an exhibit commemorating the anniversary will be unveiled at St. Mary’s Seminary’s Laubacher Hall. The weekend culminates on Sunday with two events: The Anniversary Mass at the Basilica at 10:45 a.m., followed by the dedication of a bust honoring Cardinal William H. Keeler, the 14th Archbishop of Baltimore…

National Catholic Register: Vindicated. The Courageous Man Who Saw How Faith Gave Birth to Science

Donald DeMarco has a fascinating story in the latest issue of the National Catholic Register. It is an essay on Pierre Duhem. Here is just a small snippet:

[...]
Pierre Maurice Marie Duhem was born June 10, 1861, in Paris. He distinguished himself as one of the most brilliant students ever to attend the highly prestigious Ecole Normal Supérieure. Of the 800 or so graduates in France in 1882, he was and remained throughout his years at Ecole, first in his class in the science department. His doctoral thesis on thermodynamics, unfortunately, contradicted the position of the chemist Marcelin Berthelot, who was a powerful figure in the French academic establishment at the time. Though Duhem’s position was later vindicated, Bertholet ensured not only that the thesis would be rejected, but that Duhem would never teach in Paris. Duhem wrote another thesis, of a more mathematical nature, that three examiners accepted. But his career was permanently hampered as a result of his clash with Berth…

Early Roundup - Easter Friday, March 28th, 2008

Divine Mercy Sunday (Sunday after Easter)

The Decree of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments of May 5, 2000, which added this title to the Sunday after Easter ("Low Sunday" or "Quasi Modo Sunday"), did not intend to leave this as an optional title. The requirements for this Feast of Divine Mercy are recounted here. Additional information can be found here on personal preparations.

It is impossible to assemble a complete listing of Parishes which have the Divine Mercy liturgy. In most cases, the Divine Mercy liturgy is held after the last Mass on Sunday and is followed by Benediction. For that purpose, you will need to go to the Parish closest to you and to see the Bulletin for this coming Sunday for times. There are Divine Mercy Sunday liturgies scheduled at most major Cathedrals including that in Washington, DC and Baltimore. The National Shrine of the Grotto of Lourdes in Emmitsburg, MD also has a liturgy scheduled.

Evening Roundup - Easter Thursday, March 27th, 2008

NLM: Interview with Cardinal Castrillón carries some important comments

Gregor Kollmorgen of The New Liturgical Movement carries an interview from L'Osservatore Romano with Cardinal Castrillon-Hoyos with some fascinating disclosures. Here is just one:

[...]

"The pope offers to the Church a treasure which is spiritual, cultural, religious and catholic. We have received letters of agreement also from prelates of the orthodox churches, from anglican and protestant faithtful. Lastly there are some priests of the Fraternity of Saint Pius X who, exceptionally, are searching to regularize their position. Some of them have already signed the formula of adhesion. We are informed that there are traditionalist lay faithful, close to the Fraternity, who have begun to frequent Masses in the older rite offered in the churches of the dioceses."His full translation is here.

Further update: TLM Mass at Saint Lawrence Chapel in Harrisburg, PA

Another New TLM Parish added in McLean, Virginia!

Jimmy Akin.org: NewsWeak - "Well, That About Wraps It Up For God"

Tim Jones of "Old World Swine" posted this story on the Jimmy Akin blog. His comments are perfect:

Her problem is this; How does she expect scientists to mathematically disprove the existence of God, when they can't prove the existence of mathematics? I'm puzzled how she hopes Science will go about proving that faith is unreasonable, when it can't begin to demonstrate even that reason is reasonable. All Ms. Azpurua's faith is in Scientism, her chosen religion, and she is on the verge of a religious ecstacy, overtaken by mysterious utterances that sound a great deal like gibberish;"At some point will it be possible to find proof that God or the Ultimate Designer does not exist?" or, "What about possible contributions toward finding a final theory? Would that upset religious believers?"I don't care how many theories and equations you stack on one another, explain "2+2=4". For that matter, explain why "2" is not just …

New TLM Mass location added in Virginia

I have added a new TLM Mass to the right menu. The Mass is celebrated at Saint John the Baptist Parish in Front Royal, VA on Sundays at 12:30 PM. Saint John's is in the Diocese of Arlington and it is a TLM Mass as is the one at St. Lawrence. You will find both now listed in the menu bar.

I have also specified which Masses are Latin Novus Ordo. If the Mass location does not stipulate "Latin Novus Ordo," the Mass location is celebrating the Usus Antiquior. I may have erred, but I believe the menu is accurate.

If one of the Parishes is now holding a Mass in the Extraordinary Form, or if you know of one not listed, please contact me! I am particularly interested in adding TLM Masses in West Virginia or Southern PA. I also wish to update the Saint James the Greater website when it is complete.

Early Roundup - Easter Thursday, March 27th, 2008

Two New Novus Ordo Latin Mass Locations Added to Mass Directory Menu

Tulsa World: Inside Clear Creek Monastery

I am indebted to Shawn Tribe ofThe New Liturgical Movement for the link to this story on Clear Creek Monastery. It is absolutely beautiful!

"By some estimates, more people have climbed Mount Everest than have slept inside these cloistered walls..."
Don't miss it!


Catholic Review Online: Chrism Mass a privileged moment

His Excellency Archbishop Edwin O'Brien has posted his homily from the Chrism Mass in his weekly column entitled, "Thoughts on Our Church," in the Catholic Review Online. Here is a part of his homily:

Good Catholic people – and I humbly address all of you and all whom you represent – deacons and consecrated sisters and brothers, seminarians and laity at every level of diocesan and parish leadership: I know that I speak for your priests, here in such impressive numbers, in expressing our thanks for your indispensible collaboration in preaching the love of Christ and promoting the life of the Church in this great Archdiocese.

And I pray that you will see in this Mass a significant opportunity to demonstrate your love and appreciation of your priests. If it be God’s will, may the intended priestly focus of this Chrism Mass stress the uniqueness of ordained priesthood and generate the graces so necessary to encourage many more priestly vocations of the kind we see here.

And …

WDTPRS: Status quaestionis about liturgy by Fr. Blake

University of Maryland, College Park--Catholic Terps

One of the largest "small cities" in the state of Maryland is the University of Maryland, College Park Campus. (I don't know how often the Sitemeter read "Masses, Univ. Md., College Park"). Finally, the Catholic Terps website is up again and I have posted it on the Blogroll and Favorite Website menu to the right.

Check it out! It has a full Mass schedule and a nice activities calendar as well with links to a number of great sites. Special activities are also listed!

Our Lady of the Atonement Catholic Church, San Antonio, TX

I have had a number of visitors searching for information on Our Lady of the Atonement Catholic Church in San Antonio, Texas. This is an "Anglican Use" Parish.By using the helpful locator of the Archdiocese of San Antonio, and by stipulating "Latin" as the language, I found the Church website. The Mass schedule is here. Note the description of the Solemn High Mass for this Parish:

Worship at Our Lady of the Atonement is a spiritually enriching experience, in which the faithful are called to holiness by both the form and substance of the liturgical action.A Solemn High Mass involves the traditional use of incense, bells, a full procession, and Sacred Music from both the traditional Latin and English Catholic heritage. The Gloria, Credo and a number of hymns are always sung by the entire congregation, encouraging active participation by the laity. Other movements such as the Kyrie, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei are more often reserv…

Saint Alphonsus Church News: Divine Mercy Sunday and A Special Mass

The Saint Alphonsus online bulletin has some news of interest from Monsignor Bastress.


On March 30th, Divine Mercy Sunday (Low Sunday), the Tridentine Mass will be celebrated at 11:30 AM.

Also:
Reverend Mr. Jonathan Romanoski invites you to:

His ordination on Friday, May 30th at the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter in Lincoln, NE

His Solemn High Mass on Sunday, June 8th, will be held at St. Alphonsus Church

Reception in our Courtyard, following the Solemn High Mass

For further information, please contact the President of the Gregorian Society, Mrs. Rita Dent.

Early Roundup - Easter Wednesday, March 26th, 2008

Graduale Romanum Online

I have had numerous searches for such things as "sacred music for Lent" or "Latin hymns for Easter." This is a hard subject for me to broach as I am not a musician and I am not sure what the individual is searching for.

I suspect that a great "all around" Church hymnal for the Novus Ordo Mass is the Adoremus Hymnal. It is respected by many for fidelity and beauty. For those who wish to tackle the entire gamut of sacred music, Sancta Missa has a copy of the 1961 Graduale Romanum online for download in a PDF version of over 60 MB. That is "as good as it gets." The MusicaSacra website is probably the closest thing I can think of for being THE FIRST stop for those involved in music liturgy. It has an entire library of music available in the right menu and publishes "Sacred Music." The website includes the aforesaid Graduale Romanum with a search function.

I hope that proves helpful. I don't know of any online resources other…

Evening Roundup - Easter Tuesday, March 25th, 2008

Dignare Me: Easter Vigil at St. Alphonsus, Baltimore

I am indebted to The New Liturgical Movement for pointing me to this beautiful blog, Dignare Me Laudare Te, Virgo Sacrata. "Matthew" has a beautiful photoessay on the Easter Vigil at Saint Alphonsus Church in Baltimore. The celebrant was Monsignor Arthur W. Bastress. Matthew also included this comment:

For the third time in four years, I traveled up to St. Alphonsus Catholic Church in Baltimore, Maryland for the Easter Vigil according to the 1962 Roman Missal (Traditional Latin Mass). This church is a favorite of mine, not merely because of the beautiful Gothic architecture and decoration, but also because of its connection to St. John Neumann, who was pastor there before becoming Bishop of Philadelphia. He was also consecrated a bishop in this church.By "travel up," I assume he means from Arlington, VA which is to the south. It is a gorgeous Church as these photos show. Thanks, Matthew!

He also posts photos from the Easter Sunday Mass at Georgetown University

Jimmy Akin.org: An Actor for All Seasons

Lest I forget, Steven D. Greydanus posted the news that the gifted British actor, Paul Scofield, has died. Mr. Scofield had many memorable roles as this post notes, but he is best known for his depiction of Saint Thomas More, Lord Chancellor of England, under King Henry VIII. The film was an adaptation of a stage play by Robert Bolt and Mr Scofield had played the part on stage. Mr. Greydanus reviewed the film which is listed on the Vatican's best films list.

One of my favorite lines of the film mentioned by several of those who commented is a part of an exchange between St. Thomas More and the Duke of Norfolk:

And when we die, and you are sent to heaven for doing your conscience, and I am sent to hell for not doing mine, will you come with me, for fellowship?Please read the post, see the movie, and marvel at Scofield's craft in bringing this saint to life...

Early Roundup - Easter Tuesday, March 25th, 2008

The Black Biretta: PRIESTHOOD

Father John Trigilio who posts "The Black Biretta" has an important essay this morning about the priesthood. It is addressed to Bishops, Priests, Deacons and the laity. Here is just a small portion:
[...]

A growing concern, however, is for the orthodox, devout, parish priest who literally says the blackand does the red is that he may inadvertently neglect his spiritual NEEDS. Too many good and doctrinely sound priests and deacons burn out or become discouraged, disenchanted and disillusioned. These men have NOT lost their faith, but they are very close to losing HOPE. These men do not leave the priesthood, but they can lose their zeal and their love of what they do IF they do not take care of their own spiritual needs.

Secular progressive bishops who use a corporate business paradigm to run the diocese instill a dangerous mindset among the presbyterate. If BEING a priest becomes less important than DOING priestly things, trouble is not far behind. As B16 (and Fr Z) have point…

studiObrien: Sign of Contradiction and the New World Order

Michael D. O'Brien, the noted author of such books as "Father Elijah," has posted a fascinating essay on his website. As always, he evaluates the "mega-trends" in modern Catholic life and helps us to interpret them. Here is just a glance:

“If God is dead, then everything is permissible,” says one of the characters in Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov. But what if a person still believes in God and goes to church, perhaps even devotedly, yet his instinctive feelings and his choices remain those of a practical materialist? For such a person, “everything” is still permissible, but it is considered an unfortunate unavoidable necessity. Thus, he will need to find a self-justifying political philosophy, without which he could not live with himself. His philosophy may be brilliantly articulated or hardly articulate at all, but in its various degrees of sophistication it will do a common thing: It will deny that moral absolutes are authoritative in every sphere…

A treasure trove for information on all things Catholic

I have just added another item to the Blogroll and Favorite Websites to the right side. The site is New Advent. It is listed in menu as a Catholic Encyclopedia but it is far, far more. New Advent is a compilation of encyclopedia, the Summa Theologica, the Church Fathers, the Douay-Rheims Holy Bible (Challoner) and a Library.

If you want to find out about the Council of Chalcedon, it is there. If you want to look up Good Friday, the Easter Vigil, a particular saint, Church history, whatever--it is here.

This is a treasure trove and I find myself browsing on it from time to time. I just wanted you to know it is here.


Afternoon Roundup - Easter Monday, March 24th, 2008

BostonHerald.com: Boys step up to altar, en Mass

Morning Roundup - Easter Monday, March 24th, 2008

Catholic Review Online: Pallium pilgrimage a ‘sign of unity’

George P. Matysek, Jr. of Catholic Review Online has a summary of the upcoming trip to Rome by Archbishop Edwin O'Brien to receive his pallium. Here is a snippet from the article:

As Archbishop Edwin F. O’Brien prepares to travel to Rome to receive his pallium, he views the occasion not so much as a personal honor, but as a way of celebrating what the Archdiocese of Baltimore represents.

Pope Benedict XVI will confer the pallium, a white woolen vestment worn over the chasuble, on Archbishop O’Brien June 29 at St. Peter’s Basilica.

In the Latin rite, the pallium symbolizes the office of a metropolitan archbishop. As archbishop of Baltimore, Archbishop O’Brien is the metropolitan of the Province of Baltimore, made up of the Baltimore archdiocese and the suffragan sees of the dioceses of Richmond, Va.; Wilmington, Del.; Wheeling-Charleston, W.Va.; and Arlington, Va.

“It will be a great privilege for me to represent the great people of this archdiocese,” said Archbishop O’Brien. “It’s a…

New Link Added to Blogroll: "TRADITIONAL LATIN MASS PROPERS IN ENGLISH"

A new link has been added to the "Blogroll and Favorite Websites." The site is called "TRADITIONAL LATIN MASS PROPERS IN ENGLISH." RomanCatholic Deacon hopes to post English Propers each day for the TLM. For Latin Propers, the site under construction, Tridentine Latin Rite Missal Project is still the best bet.

Hat Tip to both bloggers!

Pontifical Institute of Sacred Music: Music of Easter

This site contains music from the Vatican Easter Mass archived by the Pontifical Institute of Sacred Music (Vatican). This includes music from the Graduale Romanum and Graduale Simplex including the "Resurrexi."

RORATE CAELI: Motu Proprio miracles: Notre-Dame de Paris

Easter Sunday Early Roundup

Daily Mass Readings, Novus Ordo, USCCB Approved

Click on the figure to bring up the Lectionary Readings for the day!

MassTimes.org: Sunday (or Easter) Masses Worldwide

Image
Click the image to find Mass Times for any location in the world. Choose from ten languages plus English. The site is self explanatory.

Note: Novus Ordo Easter Masses are likely to follow the normal Sunday schedule. MassTimes.org is also to be found in the Blogroll and Favorite Menu to the right side of this window. Just scroll down.


WDTPRS: The Holy Father’s Vigil Sermon - theological starting points for liturgy, ad orientem worship

I listened to the Homily of His Holiness Pope Benedict at the Chrism Mass and I was enthralled by his thoughts. He had many "nuggets" for thought in his reflection. He ended by mentioning this sentence, "In the early Church there was a custom whereby the Bishop or the priest, after the homily, would cry out to the faithful: "Conversi ad Dominum" – turn now towards the Lord.

As many of you know, this subject of "ad orientem" worship has been discussed fairly often by Father John Zuhlsdorf of "What Does the Prayer Really Say?" He has an analysis of the Holy Father's Homily and it is a MUST read.

Gregorian Society of Baltimore

The Gregorian Society of Baltimore is dedicated to the return of the Traditional Latin Mass in Maryland and has a website called "Ad Altare Dei" ("to the altar of God"). You will find this site linked in my "Blogroll and Favorite Websites" and called "The Gregorian Society of Baltimore."

If you click on their home page, you'll find a "sign-up" link for a new TLM at Saint John's Church in Westminster, Maryland (Westminster, Maryland Latin Mass) and a "sign-up" link for the TLM in other locales within the State of Maryland (Latin Mass in Maryland).

Under "Links to Other Sites," you'll find a link to a "Yahoo Group" which will be used for information and discussion on beginning the Traditional Latin Mass at Saint John's in Westminster, MD. One must register to be included in any "Yahoo Group."

If you have information on events concerning the TLM in Maryland, my email address is liste…

Time for the Easter Vigil (USCCB)

Sitemeter is fascinating since the "search strings" show what people are searching for. Apparently, the term "Easter Vigil" is misunderstood since many Catholics have their routine Sunday "Vigil" Mass at 4:30 or 5:00 on Saturday.

This is taken from the USCCB website:

9. When should the Easter Vigil take place?

The Vigil, by its very nature, ought to take place at night. It is not begun before nightfall and should end before daybreak on Easter Sunday.
The celebration of the Easter Vigil takes the place of the Office of Readings. The Easter Vigil begins and ends in darkness. It is a nocturnal vigil, retaining its ancient character of vigilance, and expectation, as the Christian people await the resurrection of the Lord during the night. Fire is blessed and the paschal candle is lighted to illumine the night so that all may hear the Easter proclamation and listen to the word of God proclaimed in the Scriptures. For this reason the Service of Light takes plac…